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The Royal Hotel
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Luxury Accommodation in Wairarapa

The Royal's an old hotel. If you listen, it’ll whisper to you tales from long ago, both good and bad. Epic tales of adventurers, dreamers, rogues and rebels – those who chose a different path.

It will tell you about times past. When weary travellers who’d crossed the Rimutakas could get a bed, a good meal and a drink before riding into the Wairarapa, the "land of glistening waters".

It will tell you of the times when steam power was king. When the wondrous Fell steam engine was invented that pulled travellers up and over the ranges to The Royal.

It will tell you of mysterious places and people, and of the characters that stay in the hotel rooms.

It will tell you of people who fought for right, for wrong, or did things others thought impossible.

It will tell you of soldiers marching past its doors, of New Zealand wars, and of other people’s wars.

Luxury Accommodation in Wairarapa

And if you look, The Royal will show you its secrets – in its cabinets, its stairs and on its walls.

Built in a different long-ago time, you hear its age, you hear its past. Listen for the train as it rolls by, just as it’s done for 100 years. Listen for the footsteps on the stairs, heard each day since the hotel opened. Listen for the whisper of the old sash windows when the wind brushes Featherston.

But most of all, enjoy the attention and service you’ll get from a small-town hotel, locally owned and operated, and presenting – with love – all that’s local and good to eat and drink.

Be part of history.

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Suite, Queen bed, Ensuite with clawfoot bath and shower over bath. Timber floors with rugs.

The Royal has dedicated this room to the adventures and non-conforming women who helped make New Zealand the first nation in the world to give women the right to vote.

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MINI BAR FRIDGETEA + COFFEE FACILITIESTVWIFIPHONEELECTRIC BLANKETHAIRDRYERHEATING

Small bedroom only. Queen bed, bathroom down the hall. Carpeted floors.

Violet has a room in the Royal because sometimes she and her brother and little sister have to find somewhere remote and safe to escape their evil relative Count Olaf who is after their inheritance.

Violet Baudelaire is the eldest of the three Baudelaire orphans, and is an inventor talented in mechanics. She has a younger brother, Klaus, and sister, Sunny. Violet and her siblings have had to deal with a series of unfortunate events, generally perpetrated by the evil Count. Luckily, their natural talents and resourcefulness have helped them survive.

Read more

MINI BAR FRIDGETEA + COFFEE FACILITIESTVWIFIPHONEELECTRIC BLANKETHAIRDRYERHEATING

Small bedroom only. King single / trundler bed, separate SHARED bathroom down the hallway. Carpeted floors.

When Hugo visits, this is his room. He is a friend of Jules Verne, who also keeps a room at this Hotel. Hugo comes from Paris at the turn of the 20th century, when Paris was the epicenter of technology and film. Hugo's story features Georges Méliès, a pioneer of filmmaking at the time.

Read more

MINI BAR FRIDGETEA + COFFEE FACILITIESTVWIFIPHONEELECTRIC BLANKETHAIRDRYERHEATING

Suite, Queen bed, with clawfoot bath and shower over bath. Timber floors with rugs.

Langdon St. Ives is a Victorian scientist and adventurer, respected member of the Explorers Club and societies far more obscure, consultant to scientific luminaries, and secret, unheralded saviour of humankind. As such the Royal is pleased to keep a room for him.

Read more

MINI BAR FRIDGETEA + COFFEE FACILITIESTVWIFIPHONEELECTRIC BLANKETHAIRDRYERHEATING

Small bedroom only. Queen bed, separate SHARED bathroom down the hallway. Carpeted floors.

Lyra Belacqua is a 12-year-old girl who travels to the Royal from a universe parallel to our own. Quantum physics experiments suggest that parallel universes exist, so the proprietors of the Royal are never completely surprised when Lyra comes to stay. Lyra hopes her room here will keep her safe from the Magisterium, who is unlikely to look for her in our parallel universe.

Read more

MINI BAR FRIDGETEA + COFFEE FACILITIESTVWIFIPHONEELECTRIC BLANKETHAIRDRYERHEATING

Suite, Queen bed, Ensuite with freestanding shower. Timber floors with rugs.

The Royal is a haven for adventurers, and those who do not accept the status quo. This room honours women fighters and adventurers from the New Zealand wars.

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MINI BAR FRIDGETEA + COFFEE FACILITIESTVWIFIPHONEELECTRIC BLANKETHAIRDRYERHEATING

Large Suite with lounge. Super King bed (splits into 2x king singles), Ensuite with a shower. Timber floors with rugs.

Mr Verne is a French novelist, poet, and playwright, who has a fondness for the South Seas, and keeps a room at The Royal for when he needs to write his novels of adventure, gallantry and steam-era invention. He has been the second most-translated author in the world since 1979, ranking between Agatha Christie and William Shakespeare. He has sometimes been called the "Father of Science Fiction", a title that has also been given to H. G. Wells and Hugo Gernsback.

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MINI BAR FRIDGETEA + COFFEE FACILITIESTVWIFIPHONEELECTRIC BLANKETHAIRDRYERHEATINGFULL LENGTH MIRROR

Large Suite with adjoining bedroom (rented together) 2 Queen beds. Ensuite with clawfoot bath and shower over bath. Carpeted floors.

Lady Claire Trevelyan visits the Royal from 1889 London, when Victoria is Queen, Charles Darwin's son is Prime Minister and steam-powered devices are capable of sending the adventurous to another city, another continent, or even another world. Claire Trevelyan sometimes she needs a room at The Royal to lie low when things get difficult.

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MINI BAR FRIDGETEA + COFFEE FACILITIESTVWIFIPHONEELECTRIC BLANKETHAIRDRYERHEATINGIRON / IRONING BOARD

Extra large Suite with lounge (honeymoon). Super king bed (splits into 2x king singles), large ensuite with clawfoot bath and shower over bath. Timber floors with rugs.

The grandest room in the Royal is kept for King Tāwhiao and Queen Victoria, or indeed any other royalty that care to visit. After all we're pleased to boast that only one other hotel in New Zealand has the honour of bearing the Royal crest.

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MINI BAR FRIDGETEA + COFFEE FACILITIESTVWIFIPHONEELECTRIC BLANKETHAIRDRYERHEATINGIRON / IRONING BOARD

Large Suite with lounge. Queen bed, generous ensuite with clawfoot bath and shower over bath. Carpeted floors.

George Dower keeps a room at the Royal so that he has a remote hide out at the edge of the British empire, for when his late father's inventions put him in danger.

George's main residence is in Victorian London, where he owns a clock shop which he inherited from his genius (but unfortunately corrupt) father who designed clocks, automations, clockwork humans and steam powered devices.

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MINI BAR FRIDGETEA + COFFEE FACILITIESTVWIFIPHONEELECTRIC BLANKETHAIRDRYERHEATINGIRON / IRONING BOARD

Suite, Queen bed, Ensuite with a shower. Carpeted floors.

Derkhan Blueday is an art critic and radical journalist who lives in a city called New Crobuzon where there are humans, but also other races and Remades, (victims of the system, criminals and undesirables who have had their bodies gruesomely altered). There are also steam-powered robots and cyborgs, magicians and scientists. Derkhan is a member of one of the upper-crust families of New Crobuzon and also secret correspondent and co-editor for the illegal Runagate Rampant. The Runagate Rampant is a newspaper which expresses radical ideas and beliefs and is circulated using underground networks.

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Suite, Queen bed, Ensuite with clawfoot bath and shower over bath. Timber floors with rugs.

The Royal has dedicated this room to the adventures and non-conforming women who helped make New Zealand the first nation in the world to give women the right to vote.

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Meri Te Tai Mangakāhia was a campaigner for women's suffrage in New Zealand. Mangakāhia was the wife of Hāmiora Mangakāhia, who, in 1892, was elected Premier of the Kotahitanga Parliament* in Hawke's Bay. The following year, Meri Mangakāhia addressed the assembly (the first woman to do so), submitting a motion in favour of women being allowed to vote for, and stand as, members of the Parliament. She requested not only that Māori women be given the vote, but that they be eligible to sit in the Māori parliament, thus going a step further than the contemporary aims of the European suffrage movement. She argued on the grounds that many Māori women owned and administered their own lands, either because they had no male relatives or because the women were more competent. She claimed that although chiefs had appealed to Queen Victoria over Māori problems, Māori women had received no advantage from these appeals, and suggested that the Queen might more readily respond to representations by women.

She later joined the women's committee of the Kotahitanga movement, remaining involved in Māori politics and welfare movements.

This is her story.

Meri Te Tai was of Ngāti Te Reinga, Ngāti Manawa and Te Kaitutae, three hapu of Te Rarawa. She is said to have been born on 22 May 1868, near Whakarapa (Panguru) on the Hokianga Harbour. She was the great-grandchild of a woman of mana, Nga-kahu-whero. Her father, Re Te Tai, was an influential chief of Te Rarawa in the Hokianga district in the 1890s and later; her mother was Hana Tera. Hana's marriage to Re Te Tai was her second; three children had been born of her first marriage, to a member of the Parore family. Meri was the eldest of the four children of Hana's second marriage.

Family tradition suggests that Meri Te Tai was well educated. She is said to have studied at St Mary's Convent in Auckland, and was an accomplished pianist. In the late 1880s or early 1890s she became the third wife of Hāmiora Mangakāhia, of Ngāti Whanaunga and other Coromandel hapu. He was an assessor in the Native Land Court, and was working at Waimate North in 1887. He was also at the Bay of Islands in 1889, attending the meeting at which Te Kotahitanga, the Māori parliament movement, was formally initiated.

Hāmiora and Meri built a homestead on his land at Whangapoua on the Coromandel Peninsula. During the following years Meri gave birth to four children: two sons, Mohi and Waipapa, and two daughters, Whangapoua Tangiora Edith and Mabel Te Aowhaitini. Mabel Mangakahia became a registered nurse and midwife, and is thought to have been the first Māori to gain a postgraduate diploma in public health nursing in 1939.

Hāmiora Mangakahia was elected premier of the Kotahitanga parliament in June 1892. In 1893 both he and Meri attended the second session of the parliament at Waipatu in Hawke's Bay. The women's suffrage movement had been gaining strength from the 1880s, and it is likely that Meri had knowledge of this. She may, like many Māori women, have come into contact with the New Zealand Women's Christian Temperance Union, which campaigned for women's suffrage. On 18 May 1893 the Speaker of the lower house of the Kotahitanga parliament introduced a motion from Meri Mangakahia, requesting that women be given the right to participate in the selection of members. It was suggested that she come into the house to explain her motion, and later that day she addressed the parliament – the first woman recorded to have done so.

Little further is recorded of Meri Mangakahia's participation in the Kotahitanga movement, but she continued to be active in Māori politics and welfare. An oil portrait painted about this time, preserved by her family, shows a beautiful young woman dressed in the height of European fashion. It is likely that she was a member of one of the women's committees of the Kotahitanga movement. These committees, early forerunners of the Māori Women's Welfare League, organised the activities of young people attending Kotahitanga meetings, and undertook massive catering. They also held meetings and debated political issues.

Meri and Hāmiora Mangakahia spent most of their last years together at Whangapoua. When Hāmiora died in June 1918, Meri became one of the two executors and trustees of his complicated estate. He left his property at Whangapoua to their four children, with the proviso that Meri had the right to live there and be maintained by them. She returned, however, to her own people and lands at Panguru, taking some of her children with her. According to family information she died of influenza on 10 October 1920, aged 52, and was buried at Pureirei cemetery, Lower Waihou, near her father.

*The Kotahitanga movement was an autonomous Māori Parliament convened annually in New Zealand from 1892 until 1902. Though not recognised by the New Zealand Government, the Māori Parliament was an influential body while it lasted. By 1902 its role was largely superseded by the Māori Councils established by James Carroll and Hone Heke Ngapua through the Māori Councils Act 1900. As a result, Kotahitanga members unanimously voted for its dissolution at the 10th Parliament at Waiōmatatini in 1902.

Pāpāwai was the seat of the Māori Parliament in the 1890s. There was a large two-storied Parliament house of the Kotahitanga movement at Pāpāwai, Greytown, New Zealand. It later fell into disrepair in the years following World War One.

Te Kotahitanga was distinct from Te Kauhanganui, the Māori parliament established by the Kīngitanga movement in the late 1880s, because it called for the union of all Māori tribes, whereas Te Kauhanganui was convened by and for the hapu of the Waikato-Tainui region. In 1895 the two movements considered merging, but this ultimately failed.

Small bedroom only. Queen bed, bathroom down the hall. Carpeted floors.

Violet has a room in the Royal because sometimes she and her brother and little sister have to find somewhere remote and safe to escape their evil relative Count Olaf who is after their inheritance.

Violet Baudelaire is the eldest of the three Baudelaire orphans, and is an inventor talented in mechanics. She has a younger brother, Klaus, and sister, Sunny. Violet and her siblings have had to deal with a series of unfortunate events, generally perpetrated by the evil Count. Luckily, their natural talents and resourcefulness have helped them survive.

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Violet Baudelaire, the eldest of the three Baudelaire orphans, is an inventor talented in mechanics. She has a younger brother, Klaus, and baby sister, Sunny. Violet and her siblings have had to deal with a series of unfortunate events, generally perpetrated by Count Olaf. Luckily, their natural talents and resourcefulness have helped them survive.

After their parents' death in a fire, the children were placed in the custody of Olaf, who makes continued attempts to steal their inheritance and orchestrates numerous disasters with the help of his accomplices whenever the Baudelaires attempt to flee. Time and again, the unfortunate children have to confront new mysteries surrounding their family and deep conspiracies involving a secret society, known as V.F.D., with connections to both Olaf and their parents.

Violet helps 12-year-old Klaus and little Sunny solve problems with her inventing skills. Klaus loves books and is an extraordinary speed reader who can remember everything he has ever read after reading it only once. Sunny enjoys biting things and as she has got older she has developed a love for cooking.

When thinking and concentrating on new inventions, Violet ties her long brown hair in a purple ribbon to keep it off her face. Violet has invented various objects such as a grappling hook that got her up Count Olaf's tower, a lock pick that enabled her to open up Count Olaf's suitcase, a signalling device, a climbing device made from ties, curtains, and extension cords, a rubber band ladder to get out of the burning Heimlich Hospital, and fork-assisted climbing shoes that helped her and Quigley Quagmire scale the frozen waterfall of Mount Fraught. Another of her inventions – created from a meal of bread and water – freed the siblings from the Village of Fowl Devotees' uptown jail before two of them were to be burned alive.

You can find out more about Violet and her family from Lemony Snicket, who has devoted himself to writing about them in thirteen books known as A Series of Unfortunate Events. Lemony has dedicated each of his works to a mysterious woman, his “darling, dearest, dead” Beatrice. Don’t be put off by his attempts to dissuade readers from continuing to read the Baudelaires' story, as we can assure you they make awfully interesting reading.

Lemony Snicket himself is a curious person, and you could read more about him in Lemony Snicket: The Unauthorized Autobiography, The Beatrice Letters and the noir prequel tetralogy All the Wrong Questions, which chronicles Snicket's youth.

You can read more about Lemony Snicket and his books on Wikipedia

Note: The proprietors of the Royal have been unable to discover what time period the Baudelaires come from, and the children themselves are vague about this. They’re possibly a 19th century family, given they know how to send a message via Morse code on a telegraph. Mysteriously, they also seem to know how to use a type of computer capable of advanced forgery. However, the main thing is that they feel comfortable and safe here in the Royal whenever they come to stay.

Small bedroom only. King single / trundler bed, separate SHARED bathroom down the hallway. Carpeted floors.

When Hugo visits, this is his room. He is a friend of Jules Verne, who also keeps a room at this Hotel. Hugo comes from Paris at the turn of the 20th century, when Paris was the epicenter of technology and film. Hugo's story features Georges Méliès, a pioneer of filmmaking at the time.

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When Hugo visits, this is his room. He’s a friend of Jules Verne, who also keeps a room at this hotel. Hugo comes from Paris at the turn of the 20th century, when Paris was the epicenter of technology and film.

This is Hugo's story. Hugo used to live with his widowed father, a kind clockmaker who also worked part-time at a museum. One day, his father found a broken automaton (a mechanical man designed to write with a pen) at the museum, and Hugo and he tried to repair it, his father documenting the automaton in a notebook. But sadly, Hugo’s father was killed by a fire at the museum, and Hugo was forced to live with his resentful, alcoholic uncle Claude, and was made to learn how to maintain the clocks at the railway station of Gare Montparnasse in Paris.

When Claude went missing for several days, Hugo continued to maintain the clocks, fearing that he would be sent away as an orphan by a vindictive Station Inspector Gustave, if Claude's absence was discovered. Hugo was fascinated by the automaton and the notebook because he hoped it may contain a secret message from his father. When he attempted to repair the automaton with stolen parts, he was drawn into a series of events that led him to find a friend, Isabelle, a bookshop and a toyshop in the station that all eventually (despite dangers and mishaps) help him to discover the mystery of the automaton and its relationship to the father of filmmaking George Méliès.

If you want to read about Hugo, look for the novel The Invention of Hugo Cabret written and illustrated by Brian Selznick. With 284 pictures between the book's 533 pages, the book depends as much on its pictures as it does on the words. Selznick himself has described the book as "not exactly a novel, not quite a picture book, not really a graphic novel, or a flip book or a movie, but a combination of all these things". The book won the 2008 Caldecott Medal, the first novel to do so, as the Caldecott Medal is usually for picture books. A 3D film based on the book was released in 2011.

Georges Méliès, was a French illusionist and film director who led many technical and narrative developments in the earliest days of cinema. Méliès was an especially prolific innovator in the use of special effects., and hand-painted colour. He was also one of the first filmmakers to use storyboards. His films include A Trip to the Moon (1902) and The Impossible Voyage (1904), both involving strange, surreal journeys, and are considered among the most important early science fiction films, though their approach is closer to fantasy.

The film A Trip to the Moon is loosely based on Jules Verne's From the Earth to the Moon and H. G. Wells' The First Men in the Moon.

If you would like to know more about George Méliès look up https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Georges_M%C3%A9li%C3%A8s

Suite, Queen bed, with clawfoot bath and shower over bath. Timber floors with rugs.

Langdon St. Ives is a Victorian scientist and adventurer, respected member of the Explorers Club and societies far more obscure, consultant to scientific luminaries, and secret, unheralded saviour of humankind. As such the Royal is pleased to keep a room for him.

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Langdon always has marvellous tales to tell, be it about the depths of the Borneo jungles that he has travelled though, to the starlit reaches of outer space, and the dark corridors of past and future time. However, the adventures of Langdon St. Ives invariably seem to lead him back to the streets and alleys of the busiest, darkest, most secretive city in the world – London in the age of steam and gas-lamps, with the Thames fog settling in over the vast city of perpetual evening.

St. Ives, in pursuit of the infamous Dr. Ignacio Narbondo, has discovered the living horror of revivified corpses, the deep-sea mystery of a machine with the power to drag ships to their doom, and the appalling threat of a skeleton-piloted airship descending toward the city of London itself, carrying within its gondola a living homunculus with the power to drive men mad! No wonder he needs to spend time out at the Royal...

If you would like to know more about scientist-explorer Langdon St. Ives you could read Homunculus, written in 1986 by American James P. Blaylock. It was the second book in Blaylock's loose Steampunk trilogy, following The Digging Leviathan (1984) and preceding Lord Kelvin's Machine (1992). The book was originally published as an Ace paperback by the Berkeley Publishing Group and is included in the Adventures of Langon St. Ives collection.

Blaylock used the books London Labour and the London Poor by Henry Mayhew as research for his books.

Also see: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Blaylock

Small bedroom only. Queen bed, separate SHARED bathroom down the hallway. Carpeted floors.

Lyra Belacqua is a 12-year-old girl who travels to the Royal from a universe parallel to our own. Quantum physics experiments suggest that parallel universes exist, so the proprietors of the Royal are never completely surprised when Lyra comes to stay. Lyra hopes her room here will keep her safe from the Magisterium, who is unlikely to look for her in our parallel universe.

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Lyra was brought up in the cloistered world of Jordan College, Oxford. In her world humans have daemons – physical manifestations of their souls – and live under the suffocating control of the Church and its security apparatus, the Magisterium. It’s a world of steam trains and steamships, and travelling from Oxford to London by Zeppelin. People dress in the Victorian style.

Lyra grew up knowing nothing about the Magisterium’s oppression – she and her daemon Pan were too busy getting into trouble and having adolescent adventures around Oxford. They spent a great deal of time hassling the children of Gyptian wanderers on their annual barge visits to Oxford, engaging in good-natured conflict where the Oxford kids and the Gyptian youngsters “gobble” each other – “Gobblers” being that parallel Earth’s bogeymen. But things took a decidedly darker turn when Lyra got wrapped up in the machinations of her uncle, Lord Asriel, an explorer and iconoclast.

After saving Lord Asriel from an assassination attempt and learning from him a bit about the mysterious “Dust,” (a subject that other adults avoid discussing at all costs), Lyra was introduced to the malevolent Mrs. Coulter and subsequently sent to live with her. Before she left Oxford, Lyra was given a truth-telling device called an altheiometer – or the golden compass. Powered by Dust, it discerns what’s hidden in the heart of any man, woman, or beast. While living with Mrs. Coulter (who, naturally, coveted the altheiometer), Lyra discovered that Gobblers indeed exist. And what’s more – they’d been kidnapping children for a dark purpose related to Dust. Eventually, Lyra travelled north to rescue a kidnapped friend, Will Parry, and made the acquaintance of aeronaut Lee Scoresby and his rabbit daemon Hester, as well as witches and militaristic, armoured polar bears.

Lyra and Will have gone on to wander through a series of parallel universes, encountering danger and gaining important knowledge on their way. Lyra can tell us a great deal about why ‘Dust’ is important in all universes and why we shouldn’t fear it.

If you want to know more about Lyra, Philip Pullman has written all about her adventures in the His Dark Materials trilogy: Northern Lights (1995, published as The Golden Compass in North America), The Subtle Knife (1997), and The Amber Spyglass (2000). The books have won a number of awards in our world, including the 1995 Carnegie Medal for Northern Lights and the 2001 Whitbread Book of the Year for The Amber Spyglass.

Suite, Queen bed, Ensuite with freestanding shower. Timber floors with rugs.

The Royal is a haven for adventurers, and those who do not accept the status quo. This room honours women fighters and adventurers from the New Zealand wars.

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A portrait of Pikirakau can be found in this room, a mercenary that fought in the New Zealand wars. She was famous in the 1800s. She, like many Māori women warriors, fought alongside men in both tribal and the New Zealand wars, both against or sometimes for the British. The room also has a portrait of a woman who fought against the British forces. Her name is Keeta (Te Ati Awa Wahinetoa Te Kani). She chose peaceful means to fight.

According to James Cowan, Keeta was amongst the Te Awa who reportedly pulled up survey pegs and ploughed and fenced land occupied by settlers as acts of peaceful protest. These actions delayed the surveying and sale of Māori land. Land wars raged in Taranaki from 1860 to 1863 and the raupatu (confiscation) of Taranaki lands by the Crown continued until 1881. Resistance to raupatau by Te Ati Awa, led by the prophets Te Whiti-o-Rongomai and Tohu Kākahi, created a legacy of passive resistance at Parihaka.

Pikirakau, on the other hand, earned a reputation as a mercenary acting as an intermediary between the Crown and Taranaki Māori and as a guide to the British armed forces. Her fighting skills were such that that in 1865, after she had killed six rebels and stripped them of their arms, Governor Grey paid her not to fight in the land wars in Taranaki.

She had various names including Wikitoria, Queen of Nukumaru. She was baptised Lucy Elizabeth Lord on 9 October 1842, but she was also known as Takiora, Takiora Grey (or Gray), Bloody Mary and Mrs Richard Blake. Two known photographs of Takiora exist and both have Lucy Lord on them, but one caption reads 'Wikitoria, Queen of Nukumaru, who fought under General Chute'.

Pikirakau was a commanding figure, both in photographs and in real life. Born 9 October 1842 at Russell, she was the daughter of Kotiro Hinerangi of Ngāti Tupaea and William Lord, and half-sister to Te Paea Hinerangi, the famous Pink and White Terraces guide. During the Taranaki Wars of the 1860s, Takiora and her first husband Te Mahuki worked as guides and interpreters for several British commanders. The most notable was Major Gustav Ferdinand von Tempsky, the celebrated bush fighter and painter. Both Takiora and Te Mahuki feature in some of von Tempsky's works where his romantic style makes them seem a rather pretty couple.

After Te Mahuki was killed in battle, Takiora stayed with the troops for more than two years. An account by Takiora of the death of von Tempsky, as recorded by W.H.Skinner, gives a rare glimpse into the work of the guide and her soldiers.

There are suggestions that Takiora may have been von Tempsky's mistress. As James Belich noted in I Shall Not Die: ' "I believe he had a Māori wife," wrote Wanganui settler John Wright, "This is something which may not be known." She was probably Lucy Lord or Takiora, widow of von Tempsky's 'most trusted scout', Te Mahuki, and herself an excellent scout and spy. A strong and able woman, she was half Ngāti Ruanui, a female Katene...'

And on 27 October 1869, it was Takiora who caused the last known fatalities of Titokowaru's War.

James Belich writes: 'Takiora was staying at Camp Waihi, her familiar haunt, now the headquarters of Ngāti Porou... Takiora had heard that some Ngaruahine old people had returned to their homes near Araukuku, and she told Blake of this, making him promise to capture, not kill, them. He and Piniamino led out a strong patrol, with Takiora as guide. But when three of the old people were found, the two men, Wikiriwhi and Hami, were immediately shot dead and only a woman was taken alive. Grieving for her men, the old woman recognised Takiora as her betrayer. "When the old woman saw me, she began to cry and beat me. I did not remonstrate, as I knew wrong had been done." '

Labelled a traitor by the iwi, she was also shunned by most Europeans. Records show that early in 1893, a Normanby hotel publican took out a prohibition order to stop her supply of liquor and on 3 September that same year, Lucy Takiora Lord died.

Buried as Register Entry No 67, Takiora lies on Anglican Row 5, Lot 9, Plot 02, in the Te Henui cemetery. There is little left to show of the part she once played in this country's wars, just one small square of grass.

Large Suite with lounge. Super King bed (splits into 2x king singles), Ensuite with a shower. Timber floors with rugs.

Mr Verne is a French novelist, poet, and playwright, who has a fondness for the South Seas, and keeps a room at The Royal for when he needs to write his novels of adventure, gallantry and steam-era invention. He has been the second most-translated author in the world since 1979, ranking between Agatha Christie and William Shakespeare. He has sometimes been called the "Father of Science Fiction", a title that has also been given to H. G. Wells and Hugo Gernsback.

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Jules Verne was born on 8 February 1828, on a small artificial island in the Loire River – where it flows through the seaport town of Nantes. His father was an attorney, and his mother was from a local family of navigators and shipowners, of distant Scottish descent.

At the age of six, Mr Verne was sent to boarding school. His teacher, Mme Sambin, was the widow of a naval captain who had disappeared some 30 years before. Mme Sambin often told the students her husband was a shipwrecked castaway and that he would eventually return like Robinson Crusoe from his desert island paradise. The Robinson Crusoe theme has stayed with Mr Verne throughout his life and appears in many of his novels.

Mr Verne recalls a deep childhood fascination with the Loire river and the many merchant vessels navigating it. He often spent holidays in the nearby town of Brains, at the house of his uncle Prudent Allotte, a retired shipowner, who had travelled the world and served as mayor of Brains from 1828 to 1837. A young Mr Verne took joy in playing interminable rounds of the Game of the Goose with his uncle, and both the game and his uncle's name appear in his writing.

Legend has it that, at the age of 11, Mr Verne secretly procured a spot as cabin boy on the three-mast ship Coralie, with the intention of travelling to the Indies and bringing back a coral necklace for his cousin Caroline. The ship was due to set out for the Indies that evening but his father arrived just in time to catch him. Mr Verne has told us that the legend is an exaggerated tale invented by his niece, though he admitted it may have some basis of truth.

In 1847, Mr Verne's father sent him to Paris to study law, and probably also to distance him temporarily from his cousin Caroline, who he was in love with. She was married soon after to another – Émile Dezaunay, a man of 40, with whom she would have five children.

Soon after this disappointment, Mr Verne met Rose Herminie Arnaud Grossetière, and fell intensely in love with her, writing and dedicating some 30 poems to her. His passion seems to have been reciprocated, at least for a short time, but Grossetière's parents frowned upon the idea of their daughter marrying a young student of uncertain future. Instead she was married to a rich landowner, 10 years her senior, in 1848.

The sudden marriage sent Mr Verne into deep frustration. He wrote a hallucinatory letter to his mother, in a state of half-drunkenness, in which he described his misery. This requited but aborted love affair deeply affected Mr Verne, and his novels include a significant number of young women married against their will (including Gérande in Master Zacharius (1854), Sava in Mathias Sandorf (1885), Ellen in A Floating City (1871)), to such an extent that the scholar Christian Chelebourg attributed the recurring theme to a "Herminie complex". The incident also led Mr Verne to bear a grudge against his birthplace and Nantes society.

Mr Verne was expected to follow in his father's footsteps as a lawyer, but he quit the profession early on to write. He collaborated with the publisher Pierre-Jules Hetzel in the creation of the Voyages Extraordinaires, a widely popular series of scrupulously-researched adventure novels including Journey to the Center of the Earth (1864), Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea (1870), and Around the World in Eighty Days (1873).

One of Mr Verne’s most famous literary creations is Captain Nemo who identifies himself as Prince Dakkar, son of the Hindu Raja of Bundelkund, and a descendant of the Muslim Sultan Fateh Ali Khan Tipu of the Kingdom of Mysore, famous for the Anglo-Mysore Wars (1767–1799) and Mysorean rocket technology. After the Indian Rebellion of 1857 (then called the Indian Mutiny, now called the First Indian War of Independence), in which Dakkar lost his family and his kingdom, he devoted himself to scientific research and developed the Nautilus, wherein he and a crew of followers cruise the seas, gathering bullion from shipwrecks.

“Upon a deserted island of the Pacific he established his dockyard, and there a submarine vessel was constructed from his designs. By methods which will at some future day be revealed he had rendered subservient the illimitable forces of electricity, which, extracted from inexhaustible sources, was employed for all the requirements of his floating equipage, as a moving, lighting, and heating agent. The sea, with its countless treasures, its myriads of fish, its numberless wrecks, its enormous mammalia, and not only all that nature supplied, but also all that man had lost in its depths, sufficed for every want of the prince and his crew...”

Captain Nemo dislikes imperialism (and British imperial society more generally). In The Mysterious Island he claims to have no interest in the affairs of the world, but occasionally he intervenes to aid the oppressed. He has given salvaged treasure to participants in the Cretan Revolt (1866-1869) against the island's Turkish rulers, saved a Ceylonese or Tamil pearl hunter from a diving accident (both physically and financially), and rescued castaways from drowning – all in Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea. In the The Mysterious Island he covertly protected another set of castaways. Nemo is said to have died of old age, on board the Nautilus, at Dakkar Grotto on Lincoln Island in the South Pacific. Funeral rites were administered by Cyrus Smith, one of the castaways Nemo had protected, and his vessel was then submerged in the waters of the grotto.

This reclusive, charismatic Indian genius living free of the unjust and imperialist world order thanks to his incredible giant submarine, made his return in Alan Moore’s League of Extraordinary Gentlemen graphic novels, a collage of characters from early science fiction novels. These tales have also been made into films.

When he visits, Mr Verne always takes an interest in the story of Ernest Frederick Hughes Allen, the great grandfather of Robert Allen (a proprietor of the Royal). Ernest Allen was the son of Frances Houghton, daughter of Robert Houghton, after whom Houghton Bay in Wellington is named. Ellen was part of an Anglo Samoan family and sailed the South Seas in the 1800s and early 1900s. Ernest would surely have met Captain Nemo had he been a real character! The painting of The Barque Louisa Craig on the wall above the bed and the sword displayed in the cabinet of curiosities belonged to Ernest’s eldest son, Captain Fredrick Kenneth Allen. Captain Allen was Robert Allen’s great uncle and acted as his grandfather.

To read more about him and that very interesting family see press-files.anu.edu.au

Large Suite with adjoining bedroom (rented together) 2 Queen beds. Ensuite with clawfoot bath and shower over bath. Carpeted floors.

Lady Claire Trevelyan visits the Royal from 1889 London, when Victoria is Queen, Charles Darwin's son is Prime Minister and steam-powered devices are capable of sending the adventurous to another city, another continent, or even another world. Claire Trevelyan sometimes she needs a room at The Royal to lie low when things get difficult.

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Claire is the daughter of Viscount St. Ives, a minor nobleman and inventor who gambled the family fortune on the development of combustion engine. Claire was expected to do nothing more than pour elegant cups of tea, sew a fine seam, and catch a rich husband. However, Claire’s talents lie not in the ballroom, but in engineering and the chemistry laboratory, where things have a regrettable habit of blowing up.

Unfortunately, Claire had just graduated when her father lost everything and killed himself. When her father’s estate was lost and Claire was forced out on her own, she fell in with a group of young street ruffians. They came to a sort of agreement, where Claire provided some education (on how to behave in society but also how to make small explosions) and the street urchins gave her a safe place to build a lab and sleep. Through application of lessons in mathematics, strategy and poker they have managed to keep themselves alive. Claire's prowess in Chemistry, Engineering and their practical application in the rough life on the wrong side of the river has allowed her to become the new leader in the underworld, known only as the Lady of Devices.

While we at the Royal find Lady Claire Trevelyan to be a young woman of resources and intellect, who has turned fortune on its head, she unfortunately must still deal with her mother and Lord James Selwyn, who expect Claire to be a proper lady and marry Lord James. If she can stay out of Lord James’s way until her eighteenth birthday, she will be of age and not able to be forced into marriage.

You can read more about Lady Claire Trevelyan in the Magnificent Devices series by Shelley Adina.

Extra large Suite with lounge (honeymoon). Super king bed (splits into 2x king singles), large ensuite with clawfoot bath and shower over bath. Timber floors with rugs.

The grandest room in the Royal is kept for King Tāwhiao and Queen Victoria, or indeed any other royalty that care to visit. After all we're pleased to boast that only one other hotel in New Zealand has the honour of bearing the Royal crest.

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The room is named after King Tāwhiao, who visited Wairarapa on 19 February 1883.

A correspondent of the New Zealand Times, wrote at Te Ore Ore: "Tāwhiao and his party camped last night about 12 miles from Masterton, and came on to Te Ore Ore this Saturday morning. The party consisted of 200 mounted men, a large number of the king's men went to the Te Ore Ore pah, close to Ruamahanga bridge, and stayed there for an hour or two.” The correspondent noted they were joined by a large party of the Wairarapa Māori, who came trooping in on horseback, soon after eight o'clock to form a procession of over 300 men and women. The correspondent fell into the ranks of the procession which he noted was an imposing one, with many carrying double-barrelled guns, with which they kept up a continual fusillade. He went on to write that “then by-and-by the procession was met by a body of women gaily dressed, and with green verdure on their heads and bodies, who met Tāwhiao with a dance and song of welcome, the procession halting while this was being performed. The women danced and sang with tremendous vigour. Every fifty yards of the advance there was another halt, when the songs and dances were repeated. On entering the Te Ore Ore Pah, the procession formed into a hollow square, and there were many songs of welcome. There was a large meeting-house in the Pah, 120 feet long by 50 broad – the front of which was a perfect marvel of native carving. Flags and banners were to be seen everywhere”. The correspondent also noted that everyone, particularly the women, were dressed in their gayest and brightest cloths, and things generally wore a festive air. There was abundance of provisions, with the Wairarapa attendees adding their contributions to the stock of food.

King Tāwhiao (Tukaroto Matutaera Pōtatau Te Wherowhero Tāwhiao), was an important and visionary leader, and extremely well-known in New Zealand during his reign. He was the paramount chief of the Waikato Tainui tribes and reigned from 1860 to 1894. Tāwhiao inherited the mantle of leadership from his people and followed in the footsteps of the Kīngitanga founder, his father Pōtatau Te Wherowhero. By agreement with other Māori tribes, the kingship and seat of power was conveyed on Waikato Tainui, where it continues to reside. Tāwhiao’s mother was Whakaawi, Pōtatau's senior wife. He was born at Orongokoekoea on the upper Mokau River towards the end of the musket wars between Ngā Puhi and Waikato. In 1864 Te Ua Haumēne, the Hauhau prophet, bestowed on him the name Tāwhiao.

Tāwhiao was raised by his maternal grandparents. During his adolescent years, his father encouraged him to be a man of peace. He was well-versed in the ancient rites of the Tainui priesthood as well as being a student of the Bible. In later years Tāwhiao's sayings were repeated as prophecies for the future.

His father was a renowned warrior and leader, and in 1858 was installed as the first Māori King. The Kīngitanga movement's supporters hoped the position would help protect Māori land and foster unity between tribes. On Pōtatau's death in 1860 Tāwhiao became the second Māori King. His reign was to last for 34 years, through the most turbulent era of Māori-Pākehā relations.

Two major issues that confronted Māori after the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840 were the desire of the growing settler population for more land, and increasing social disorganisation as a result of European contact. Within the space of a generation, Māori had moved from a world in which they were totally in control to one in which control was rapidly moving into the hands of the settlers. The wars of the 1860s in Taranaki and Waikato and the government's subsequent confiscation of Māori land saw Tāwhiao and his people rendered virtually landless and forced to retreat as wandering refugees into the heartland of Ngāti Maniapoto, now known as the King Country. As a result of the invasion of Waikato by British forces in 1863, on the pretext that the Waikato tribes were preparing to attack Auckland, Tāwhiao and his people lost over a million acres to the settler government and subsequently to the settlers themselves.

Tāwhiao assumed leadership of the King movement during this traumatic period. His travels, throughout the land of the Tainui people and beyond, brought him into contact with people desperately seeking hope and deliverance from settler encroachment. Many Māori communities have retained accounts of Tāwhiao's visits and sayings, in varying versions and with differing interpretations. The people were suffering from anxiety, deprivation, frustration and alienation. If deliverance was not to be found on earth, then perhaps assistance for Māori could be sought on another plane. A promise of salvation is encapsulated in the saying often heard on Waikato marae: 'This way of life will not continue beyond the days of my grandchildren when we shall reach salvation.' Tāwhiao became aware that his was not a unique struggle. He believed that in time others would come to the assistance of his cause, hence his saying, 'My friends will come from the four ends of the world. They are the shoemakers, the blacksmiths and the carpenters.'

If you are interested in learning more about Tāwhiao and the dark days of the New Zealand Wars (and the Waikato war in particular), which were the background to Tāwhiao reign, read The Great War for New Zealand, Waikato 1800-2000 (2016) by Vincent O’Malley. This book was the 2016 New Zealand Herald Book of the Year.

You can also read more about Tāwhiao in Te Ara, the Encyclopedia of New Zealand

Queen Victoria

Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria; 24 May 1819 – 22 January 1901) was Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from 20 June 1837 until her death. On 1 May 1876, she adopted the additional title of Empress of India.

Victoria was the daughter of Prince Edward, Duke of Kent and Strathearn, the fourth son of King George III. Both the Duke of Kent and King George III died in 1820, and Victoria was raised under close supervision by her German-born mother, Princess Victoria of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld. She inherited the throne at the age of 18, after her father's three elder brothers had all died, leaving no surviving legitimate children. The United Kingdom was already an established constitutional monarchy, in which the sovereign held relatively little direct political power. Privately, Victoria attempted to influence government policy and ministerial appointments; publicly, she became a national icon who was identified with strict standards of personal morality.

Victoria married her first cousin, Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, in 1840. Their nine children married into royal and noble families across the continent, tying them together and earning her the sobriquet "the grandmother of Europe". After Albert's death in 1861, Victoria plunged into deep mourning and avoided public appearances. As a result of her seclusion, republicanism temporarily gained strength, but in the latter half of her reign her popularity recovered. Her Golden and Diamond Jubilees were times of public celebration.

Victoria's reign of 63 years and seven months was longer than that of any of her predecessors, and is known as the Victorian era. It was a period of industrial, cultural, political, scientific, and military change within the United Kingdom, and was marked by a great expansion of the British Empire.

Large Suite with lounge. Queen bed, generous ensuite with clawfoot bath and shower over bath. Carpeted floors.

George Dower keeps a room at the Royal so that he has a remote hide out at the edge of the British empire, for when his late father's inventions put him in danger.

George's main residence is in Victorian London, where he owns a clock shop which he inherited from his genius (but unfortunately corrupt) father who designed clocks, automations, clockwork humans and steam powered devices.

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George Dower keeps a room at the Royal so that he has a remote hide out at the edge of the British empire, for when his late father's inventions put him in danger.

George's main residence is in Victorian London, where he owns a clock shop which he inherited from his genius (but unfortunately corrupt) father who designed clocks, automations, clockwork humans and steam powered devices.

These various (sometimes dangerous) mechanisms often find their way back to him, but George is often, alas, befuddled by them, and is not always even sure of their original purpose. George is also at peril from those who would use his father’s vision for their gain at his expense. This has led to many strange adventures which he has been fortunate to escape intact.

His adventures involve ongoing conflict with the Royal Anti-Society, the Godly Army, and the Ladies Union for the Suppression of Carnal Vice. While George is somewhat shocked by some people's behaviour (being a bit of a Victorian gentleman prude), he none-the-less is a welcome visitor at the Royal, always being full of ironic understatement and witty euphemisms. Even at his bleakest moments, George Dower is very funny.

George, like all our guests, loves books. His favourite illustrator is Arthur Rackham and some of Arthur Rackham’s work is displayed on the walls of this room for your appreciation.

If you would like to know more about George Dower, you can read about him in the three Infernal Device novels by K.W. Jeter. Jeter is credited with coining the phrase Steam Punk.

You can read more about K.W. Jeter at en.wikipedia.org/wiki/K._W._Jeter

Suite, Queen bed, Ensuite with a shower. Carpeted floors.

Derkhan Blueday is an art critic and radical journalist who lives in a city called New Crobuzon where there are humans, but also other races and Remades, (victims of the system, criminals and undesirables who have had their bodies gruesomely altered). There are also steam-powered robots and cyborgs, magicians and scientists. Derkhan is a member of one of the upper-crust families of New Crobuzon and also secret correspondent and co-editor for the illegal Runagate Rampant. The Runagate Rampant is a newspaper which expresses radical ideas and beliefs and is circulated using underground networks.

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This is what we know from Derhan about what she is currently writing about New Crobuzon. Derkhan is friends with both Isaac and his khepri artist lover Lin. Isaac is a scientist who is trying to help a crippled birdman fly again, but by accident has released a plague of trans-dimensional moths (slakemoths) that eat people's minds onto the city. With the aid of Derkhan, Isaac has discovered that the government had been involved in selling the slakemoths to begin with. The security forces have also become aware of the activities of the slakemoths and are beginning to suppress the various rebellious elements within the city. To re-capture the slakemoths, they are attempting to enlist the help of demons and the Weaver, a spider-like creature who moves through dimensions, obsessed with patterns and its own peculiar view of beauty. The demons have refused to assist, and the Weaver has begun to aide Isaac.

It is not clear how Derkhan travels to the Royal, however we know that New Crobuzon is a place where both magic (she refers to it as 'thaumaturgy') and steam technology exist. She is always a welcome visitor when she needs a safe place to write about what is happening in New Crobuzon.

If you would like to read more about her city, China Miéville writes about it in Perdido Street Station. His work has won several literary awards.

Also see: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perdido_Street_Station